Champaign Personal Injury FAQs

  1. 1.
    Are there time limits after I'm injured to file a lawsuit?

    There’s no general number, but in most cases, you almost always have at least one year to file a lawsuit. This gives you plenty of time to research relevant laws and find a lawyer, but don’t wait! Certain lawsuits must be filed within this one-year period. The exception to this is if you are suing a government agency.

    Because the government gets to write the rules, it’s harder to sue them. In some cases, you have as little as 60 days to file a lawsuit against a government agency.

  2. 2.
    Why should I hire Tuggle, Schiro, Lichtenberger & Themer?

    Our legal team has the experience and resources to settle your case or litigate the matter, depending on what’s in your best interest. We work with medical experts, engineers / investigators and other experts to establish the evidence and the financial impact of your situation to maximize your recovery.

    If you, a family member or a friend has been seriously injured or died as a result of someone else’s fault, we can help you get the compensation you deserve.

  3. 3.
    How much is my personal injury claim worth?

    Unfortunately, there’s no magic number. The factors an insurance company or defendant looks at when evaluating your claim are numerous and vary by case. The most common factors used are those that come with a clear dollar value. These include lost wages, medical bills and lost property among others.

    Contact us today!

Contact us today!

  1. 4.
    Should I sign a release or anything from an insurance company?

    Not until consulting with a lawyer first! Most of the time, an insurance company will not pay you without obtaining your signature on a release. But a signed release allows the insurance company to be free from the obligation to pay anything more on your claim. It also prevents you from bringing up a lawsuit in the future.

    A good legal team like the attorneys at Tuggle, Schiro, Lichtenberger & Themer should be able to review a release and advise you whether you risk losing any rights by signing it.

  2. 5.
    The insurance company is offering to settle. Should I accept the money?

    Always view offers from an insurance company with suspicion. Remember, insurance companies are in the business of making money. Plus, if it’s not your insurance company, they don’t have your best interests in mind. That means they’ll use every legal trick in the book to force you into a quick settlement – even if it means they don’t play fair.

    Contact an experienced legal team like the one at Tuggle, Schiro, Lichtenberger & Themer before you accept any kind of settlement. You may be entitled to more than what the insurance company is offering you.

  3. 6.
    The insurance company is asking for a recorded statement. Should I give one?

    No! Despite what an insurance adjuster may tell you, you are not required to give a statement. Even if the insurance company sends you letters threatening to “close their file” without your statement, you should not give a statement.

    Adjusters are trained to conduct interviews and to secure testimony that makes it less likely for their driver to be found at fault. If you give a recorded statement, it can be used as future evidence in a lawsuit.

  4. 7.
    If I have to pay a lawyer part of my settlement, does that mean I will get less for myself?

    No. The job of your lawyer is to maximize the value of your case. It’s commonly known that insurance companies rarely pay anywhere near the full value to injured persons who are not represented by a lawyer.

    The legal team at Tuggle, Schiro, Lichtenberger & Themer has a strong reputation, years of experience and access to investigators and expert witnesses to prove your case. We know how to prove an injury. The combination of these factors and our ability to take the responsible party to court is worth hiring us. We will do everything we can to get you the settlement you deserve.

    Contact us to start your case today.

I agree that by contacting you that no client-lawyer relationship has been created. The information that I provide will not be kept confidential. The information on this website is general information and does not constitute legal advice and the reader should not rely on it to solve their individual problem.